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waterloo region museum exhibit explains water flow from kitchen tap to oceanwaterloo region museum exhibit explains water flow from kitchen tap to oceanwaterloo region museum exhibit explains water flow from kitchen tap to ocean - empty plastic drinking

by:Koodee      2019-08-20
waterloo region museum exhibit explains water flow from kitchen tap to oceanwaterloo region museum exhibit explains water flow from kitchen tap to oceanwaterloo region museum exhibit explains water flow from kitchen tap to ocean  -  empty plastic drinking bottles
KITCHENER—
A century ago, when the Waterloo area was a prosperous industrial area, there was not much thought about injecting sewage into the river.
James Jansen, curator of the latest exhibition of the Waterloo area Museum "ocean journey", said: "The River through kidina and Cambridge used to be a huge sewer ! "!
Explore how the basin works.
The exhibition will last until May 10.
"The joke at the time was that you could walk through the big river with so much rubbish in it," he said . ".
Today, the joke is not that interesting, and fortunately, through the efforts of the enlightened municipalities and the great river protection bureau, the river is crystal clear again.
But that does not mean that the problem of water has been solved.
This new exhibition tries to answer questions and make people think about their dayto-
Life during the day affects the water in the local and world oceans.
Of course, there is a lot of good news.
A display screen looks like a huge pop bottle dispenser, but in fact the light behind the bottle glows when the button is pressed, indicating how much water is used per person per day on average.
In 1994, the figure was 400 liters.
This figure fell to 195 liters in 2014, a significant improvement.
However, there are still problems with all these empty plastic bottles, of which hundreds are used by graduate students at the University of Waterloo water College to make giant octopus and jelly fish.
Water is consumed from thousands of water bottles every year, he says, and the water coming out of the kitchen faucet is very good.
"Why do we drink water from other communities?
Why are we spending so much money?
He added that of all the plastics we consume each year, only 20 per cent are made of recycled materials.
Plastic poses a danger to the environment and breaks down into small beads found in remote waters like the Arctic that affect fragile ecosystems.
"It eventually rotates in the ocean," says Jensen, noting that there is huge floating garbage in the ocean, weighing millions of tons, all from where we live.
"The garbage comes from land," he said . "
So a small piece of plastic blows down from the yard, down the driveway to the street, and will eventually disappear in the river system, and will eventually reach these swirls, which are circular ocean currents.
Most of the content of "sea trip!
"It is part of a tourism exhibition on loan at the Ithaca Science Center in New York and complements information from local sources such as the great river protection agency and the Waterloo area.
The museum staff designed elements that formed the roots of information locally, such as a huge watershed map attached to the floor, and a portion of the map rose several centimeters on a platform.
This area of the map is highlighted because of its 200 wells, which are represented by small red buttons.
When lit, the button shows where most of the drinking water in the area comes from.
It is simple and surprising to see how many production wells there are.
There are actually 400 wells, too many to display on one monitor, Jensen said.
Only 25 per cent of our water was taken from the river.
While all this may sound too complicated for the kids, in fact, the way the exhibition is designed, there are various buttons to press, the screen to touch, and crazy mechanical devices, make a point without preaching.
In fact, all of this is very important and does not cover up the details, especially those related to pollution.
A device that looks like a vertical pin ball machine has a series of balls passing through a metal cage, each of which is in the same place and represents the ocean in this case.
The submersible allows young people the opportunity to use a joystick to drive on the floor of the ocean, pond and River while watching video images of aquatic life on the screen.
The board explains the importance of the local system and the great river protection agency, Canada's first watershed management agency.
"In 1934, it was built to protect people from Rivers, and ultimately to protect them from people," Jensen said . ".
Vhill @ therecord. com KITCHENER—
A century ago, when the Waterloo area was a prosperous industrial area, there was not much thought about injecting sewage into the river.
James Jansen, curator of the latest exhibition of the Waterloo area Museum "ocean journey", said: "The River through kidina and Cambridge used to be a huge sewer ! "!
Explore how the basin works.
The exhibition will last until May 10.
"The joke at the time was that you could walk through the big river with so much rubbish in it," he said . ".
Today, the joke is not that interesting, and fortunately, through the efforts of the enlightened municipalities and the great river protection bureau, the river is crystal clear again.
But that does not mean that the problem of water has been solved.
This new exhibition tries to answer questions and make people think about their dayto-
Life during the day affects the water in the local and world oceans.
Of course, there is a lot of good news.
A display screen looks like a huge pop bottle dispenser, but in fact the light behind the bottle glows when the button is pressed, indicating how much water is used per person per day on average.
In 1994, the figure was 400 liters.
This figure fell to 195 liters in 2014, a significant improvement.
However, there are still problems with all these empty plastic bottles, of which hundreds are used by graduate students at the University of Waterloo water College to make giant octopus and jelly fish.
Water is consumed from thousands of water bottles every year, he says, and the water coming out of the kitchen faucet is very good.
"Why do we drink water from other communities?
Why are we spending so much money?
He added that of all the plastics we consume each year, only 20 per cent are made of recycled materials.
Plastic poses a danger to the environment and breaks down into small beads found in remote waters like the Arctic that affect fragile ecosystems.
"It eventually rotates in the ocean," says Jensen, noting that there is huge floating garbage in the ocean, weighing millions of tons, all from where we live.
"The garbage comes from land," he said . "
So a small piece of plastic blows down from the yard, down the driveway to the street, and will eventually disappear in the river system, and will eventually reach these swirls, which are circular ocean currents.
Most of the content of "sea trip!
"It is part of a tourism exhibition on loan at the Ithaca Science Center in New York and complements information from local sources such as the great river protection agency and the Waterloo area.
The museum staff designed elements that formed the roots of information locally, such as a huge watershed map attached to the floor, and a portion of the map rose several centimeters on a platform.
This area of the map is highlighted because of its 200 wells, which are represented by small red buttons.
When lit, the button shows where most of the drinking water in the area comes from.
It is simple and surprising to see how many production wells there are.
There are actually 400 wells, too many to display on one monitor, Jensen said.
Only 25 per cent of our water was taken from the river.
While all this may sound too complicated for the kids, in fact, the way the exhibition is designed, there are various buttons to press, the screen to touch, and crazy mechanical devices, make a point without preaching.
In fact, all of this is very important and does not cover up the details, especially those related to pollution.
A device that looks like a vertical pin ball machine has a series of balls passing through a metal cage, each of which is in the same place and represents the ocean in this case.
The submersible allows young people the opportunity to use a joystick to drive on the floor of the ocean, pond and River while watching video images of aquatic life on the screen.
The board explains the importance of the local system and the great river protection agency, Canada's first watershed management agency.
"In 1934, it was built to protect people from Rivers, and ultimately to protect them from people," Jensen said . ".
Vhill @ therecord. com KITCHENER—
A century ago, when the Waterloo area was a prosperous industrial area, there was not much thought about injecting sewage into the river.
James Jansen, curator of the latest exhibition of the Waterloo area Museum "ocean journey", said: "The River through kidina and Cambridge used to be a huge sewer ! "!
Explore how the basin works.
The exhibition will last until May 10.
"The joke at the time was that you could walk through the big river with so much rubbish in it," he said . ".
Today, the joke is not that interesting, and fortunately, through the efforts of the enlightened municipalities and the great river protection bureau, the river is crystal clear again.
But that does not mean that the problem of water has been solved.
This new exhibition tries to answer questions and make people think about their dayto-
Life during the day affects the water in the local and world oceans.
Of course, there is a lot of good news.
A display screen looks like a huge pop bottle dispenser, but in fact the light behind the bottle glows when the button is pressed, indicating how much water is used per person per day on average.
In 1994, the figure was 400 liters.
This figure fell to 195 liters in 2014, a significant improvement.
However, there are still problems with all these empty plastic bottles, of which hundreds are used by graduate students at the University of Waterloo water College to make giant octopus and jelly fish.
Water is consumed from thousands of water bottles every year, he says, and the water coming out of the kitchen faucet is very good.
"Why do we drink water from other communities?
Why are we spending so much money?
He added that of all the plastics we consume each year, only 20 per cent are made of recycled materials.
Plastic poses a danger to the environment and breaks down into small beads found in remote waters like the Arctic that affect fragile ecosystems.
"It eventually rotates in the ocean," says Jensen, noting that there is huge floating garbage in the ocean, weighing millions of tons, all from where we live.
"The garbage comes from land," he said . "
So a small piece of plastic blows down from the yard, down the driveway to the street, and will eventually disappear in the river system, and will eventually reach these swirls, which are circular ocean currents.
Most of the content of "sea trip!
"It is part of a tourism exhibition on loan at the Ithaca Science Center in New York and complements information from local sources such as the great river protection agency and the Waterloo area.
The museum staff designed elements that formed the roots of information locally, such as a huge watershed map attached to the floor, and a portion of the map rose several centimeters on a platform.
This area of the map is highlighted because of its 200 wells, which are represented by small red buttons.
When lit, the button shows where most of the drinking water in the area comes from.
It is simple and surprising to see how many production wells there are.
There are actually 400 wells, too many to display on one monitor, Jensen said.
Only 25 per cent of our water was taken from the river.
While all this may sound too complicated for the kids, in fact, the way the exhibition is designed, there are various buttons to press, the screen to touch, and crazy mechanical devices, make a point without preaching.
In fact, all of this is very important and does not cover up the details, especially those related to pollution.
A device that looks like a vertical pin ball machine has a series of balls passing through a metal cage, each of which is in the same place and represents the ocean in this case.
The submersible allows young people the opportunity to use a joystick to drive on the floor of the ocean, pond and River while watching video images of aquatic life on the screen.
The board explains the importance of the local system and the great river protection agency, Canada's first watershed management agency.
"In 1934, it was built to protect people from Rivers, and ultimately to protect them from people," Jensen said . ".
Vhill @ therecord.
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