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how space technology is helping canadians boldly grow where no one has grown beforehow space technology is helping canadians boldly grow where no one has grown beforehow space technology is helping canadians boldly grow where no one has grown before - s

by:Koodee      2019-08-01
how space technology is helping canadians boldly grow where no one has grown beforehow space technology is helping canadians boldly grow where no one has grown beforehow space technology is helping canadians boldly grow where no one has grown before  -  stainless steel drink cubes
Do you think it's hard to grow tomatoes on the moon?
Try Yellowknife.
Canadian researchers are using space technology to plant more than 60 crops.
Using a water farming system that provides food for astronauts, residents can harvest fruits and vegetables a year
In the extreme climate of northern Canada.
The prototype was designed for the N. River. W. T.
The Northern Farm Training Academy will accommodate five units there.
Environmental biologist Mike Dixon knows what it takes to plant plants in barren places inside and outside the Earth.
"The Moon or Mars is as bad as the Northwest, where you don't often grow food outdoors," says Dixon, a professor at the University of Guelph and director of the school's controlled environmental systems research facility.
"It's too hard to eat fresh things in Northern Canada.
It is wise to adopt this technology.
"It takes 12 days for strawberries to go from Mexico to Yellowknife. Shipped-
Expensive food: about $1 banana.
Toronto is $4 per kilogram. 17 in Nunavut.
It's hard to come here.
The Canadian Food Safety Association says one out of every three people in Nunavut faces food safety issues every month.
"Some communities do not have the soil to grow their own food, and traditional food is difficult to obtain for various reasons (
The cost of going out to land is high, and traditional knowledge is lost)
The northern and remote Food Network of the advocacy group said.
Six perishable foods will be planted in the northern pilot project
Cucumbers, tomatoes, strawberries, bell peppers, lettuce and herbs
Import otherwise.
It is not a greenhouse that requires sunlight to grow plants.
Instead, imagine a sealed stainless steel cube, which is the size equivalent to the Baker's shelf, with a shelf and a thick glass roof that can be cut through
LED lighting. This allows 24-
Hours of growth, in an area where the sun barely rises for months in a row, 12 months a year.
Led is a big factor.
Strawberry growers in Japan doubled their production using supplemental blue LEDs, while purple LEDs in the Netherlands stimulated lettuce growth.
Norwegian lighting company Intravision has customized the best photosynthesis spectrum for the prototype.
Dickson's lab is developing the right color "recipe" for each plant ".
"We must be careful.
By adjusting the lights, we can make the taste of the plants different.
"You don't want strawberries to taste like donuts," he said . ". The self-
The computer-based agricultural system promotes itself
Adequate nutrition in remote areas.
It is now used in the Kuwaiti desert where cherry tomatoes and cucumbers are grown, another hostile environment.
The cost of the prototype was about $2 million.
Another partner of the project said it was not surprising to reduce the angle of space to Earth.
"There are many similarities between Mars and the North.
The system types of both environments must be resource efficient, contain multiple backups, and provide high
Alan Scott, a physicist at Ottawa space Com Dev, said: "Nutritional value
The hardware company that designed the prototype.
Dickson says extreme land farming is a test field for space farming.
"Following the snow Bank of Canada, the next worst place to grow plants must be the moon," Dixon said . ".
Sounds like a challenge.
Is it hard to plant tomatoes on the moon?
Try Yellowknife.
Canadian researchers are using space technology to plant more than 60 crops.
Using a water farming system that provides food for astronauts, residents can harvest fruits and vegetables a year
In the extreme climate of northern Canada.
The prototype was designed for the N. River. W. T.
The Northern Farm Training Academy will accommodate five units there.
Environmental biologist Mike Dixon knows what it takes to plant plants in barren places inside and outside the Earth.
"The Moon or Mars is as bad as the Northwest, where you don't often grow food outdoors," says Dixon, a professor at the University of Guelph and director of the school's controlled environmental systems research facility.
"It's too hard to eat fresh things in Northern Canada.
It is wise to adopt this technology.
"It takes 12 days for strawberries to go from Mexico to Yellowknife. Shipped-
Expensive food: about $1 banana.
Toronto is $4 per kilogram. 17 in Nunavut.
It's hard to come here.
The Canadian Food Safety Association says one out of every three people in Nunavut faces food safety issues every month.
"Some communities do not have the soil to grow their own food, and traditional food is difficult to obtain for various reasons (
The cost of going out to land is high, and traditional knowledge is lost)
The northern and remote Food Network of the advocacy group said.
Six perishable foods will be planted in the northern pilot project
Cucumbers, tomatoes, strawberries, bell peppers, lettuce and herbs
Import otherwise.
It is not a greenhouse that requires sunlight to grow plants.
Instead, imagine a sealed stainless steel cube, which is the size equivalent to the Baker's shelf, with a shelf and a thick glass roof that can be cut through
LED lighting. This allows 24-
Hours of growth, in an area where the sun barely rises for months in a row, 12 months a year.
Led is a big factor.
Strawberry growers in Japan doubled their production using supplemental blue LEDs, while purple LEDs in the Netherlands stimulated lettuce growth.
Norwegian lighting company Intravision has customized the best photosynthesis spectrum for the prototype.
Dickson's lab is developing the right color "recipe" for each plant ".
"We must be careful.
By adjusting the lights, we can make the taste of the plants different.
"You don't want strawberries to taste like donuts," he said . ". The self-
The computer-based agricultural system promotes itself
Adequate nutrition in remote areas.
It is now used in the Kuwaiti desert where cherry tomatoes and cucumbers are grown, another hostile environment.
The cost of the prototype was about $2 million.
Another partner of the project said it was not surprising to reduce the angle of space to Earth.
"There are many similarities between Mars and the North.
The system types of both environments must be resource efficient, contain multiple backups, and provide high
Alan Scott, a physicist at Ottawa space Com Dev, said: "Nutritional value
The hardware company that designed the prototype.
Dickson says extreme land farming is a test field for space farming.
"Following the snow Bank of Canada, the next worst place to grow plants must be the moon," Dixon said . ".
Sounds like a challenge.
Is it hard to plant tomatoes on the moon?
Try Yellowknife.
Canadian researchers are using space technology to plant more than 60 crops.
Using a water farming system that provides food for astronauts, residents can harvest fruits and vegetables a year
In the extreme climate of northern Canada.
The prototype was designed for the N. River. W. T.
The Northern Farm Training Academy will accommodate five units there.
Environmental biologist Mike Dixon knows what it takes to plant plants in barren places inside and outside the Earth.
"The Moon or Mars is as bad as the Northwest, where you don't often grow food outdoors," says Dixon, a professor at the University of Guelph and director of the school's controlled environmental systems research facility.
"It's too hard to eat fresh things in Northern Canada.
It is wise to adopt this technology.
"It takes 12 days for strawberries to go from Mexico to Yellowknife. Shipped-
Expensive food: about $1 banana.
Toronto is $4 per kilogram. 17 in Nunavut.
It's hard to come here.
The Canadian Food Safety Association says one out of every three people in Nunavut faces food safety issues every month.
"Some communities do not have the soil to grow their own food, and traditional food is difficult to obtain for various reasons (
The cost of going out to land is high, and traditional knowledge is lost)
The northern and remote Food Network of the advocacy group said.
Six perishable foods will be planted in the northern pilot project
Cucumbers, tomatoes, strawberries, bell peppers, lettuce and herbs
Import otherwise.
It is not a greenhouse that requires sunlight to grow plants.
Instead, imagine a sealed stainless steel cube, which is the size equivalent to the Baker's shelf, with a shelf and a thick glass roof that can be cut through
LED lighting. This allows 24-
Hours of growth, in an area where the sun barely rises for months in a row, 12 months a year.
Led is a big factor.
Strawberry growers in Japan doubled their production using supplemental blue LEDs, while purple LEDs in the Netherlands stimulated lettuce growth.
Norwegian lighting company Intravision has customized the best photosynthesis spectrum for the prototype.
Dickson's lab is developing the right color "recipe" for each plant ".
"We must be careful.
By adjusting the lights, we can make the taste of the plants different.
"You don't want strawberries to taste like donuts," he said . ". The self-
The computer-based agricultural system promotes itself
Adequate nutrition in remote areas.
It is now used in the Kuwaiti desert where cherry tomatoes and cucumbers are grown, another hostile environment.
The cost of the prototype was about $2 million.
Another partner of the project said it was not surprising to reduce the angle of space to Earth.
"There are many similarities between Mars and the North.
The system types of both environments must be resource efficient, contain multiple backups, and provide high
Alan Scott, a physicist at Ottawa space Com Dev, said: "Nutritional value
The hardware company that designed the prototype.
Dickson says extreme land farming is a test field for space farming.
"Following the snow Bank of Canada, the next worst place to grow plants must be the moon," Dixon said . ".
Sounds like a challenge.
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