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another view: a wine glass that’s half emptyanother view: a wine glass that’s half emptyanother view: a wine glass that’s half empty - wine glass

by:Koodee      2019-07-28
another view: a wine glass that’s half emptyanother view: a wine glass that’s half emptyanother view: a wine glass that’s half empty  -  wine glass
The editorial was first published in the Toronto Star: consumers in Ontario can raise their glasses to celebrate the news that some grocery stores can finally buy wine later this year.
Or a glass of water. down wine?
From what we know so far.
Consumers were disappointed when the plan was launched.
The Wayne government didn't officially announce the details until later this month, but according to an exclusive report by star Martin Regg Cohen, it may be harder for consumers to initially find wine in the grocery store than beer.
In addition, half of the new stores will only run Ontario-
The wine brewed in the first three years has been open for six years.
Year introduction phase. Why so slow?
Compared to meeting the repressed needs, the government seems to place more emphasis on protecting its bottom line and appeasing local wine interests
Consumer needs for convenience and choice.
Should go further.
It should expand restrictions on grocery wine sales while promoting local wine sales. It can do both.
First, wine will be available at 150 grocery stores for more than 6 years, while beer will eventually be available at 450 stores.
A wine license may be issued in the future, but this is a very long introduction period.
The difference seems more to protect the government's interest in selling wine through its 651 profitable LCBO point of sale, which brings about $2 billion in wine sales each year, instead of meeting the convenience of consumers in local supermarkets.
Also, while the government asked the grocery store to use the beer shelf space for the protection of craft breweries in the province, it came up with a more complex and inconvenient way to protect Ontario wineries.
Of the 70 initial licenses to sell wine to grocery stores, only half are in three-year phase-in period.
When the next 80 licenses were granted, 40 of them would be limited to wine in Ontario, and the protectionist provisions were not phased out until 2022.
Six years later today.
It is understandable that the government wants to nurture the precious wine industry in the province.
So should it.
150 wineries in the province employ 3,500 people directly and 10,500 indirectly.
But why not take a very good plan closer to what it has proposed to protect the Ontario craft brewery by adjusting the shelf space that must be used in each franchise store for provincial wines?
In fact, the plan suggests that craft breweries in Ontario can compete with foreign breweries
When Loblaws announced that it would offer all the beer shelf space to small beer makers in Ontario, the beer giant was under control.
So is the reward-
Win Ontario winery
Finally, it seems that the wine planned to launch at the grocery store is only a half empty glass.
After decades of strict control, opening the market has never been easy.
But now that it's finally done, the province should offer consumers more options in all stores that have been licensed to sell wine.
It should increase the number of these licenses more quickly.
This reform is long overdue and the Ontario are ready for a bolder reform.
The editorial was first published in the Toronto Star: consumers in Ontario can raise their glasses to celebrate the news that some grocery stores can finally buy wine later this year.
Or a glass of water. down wine?
From what we know so far.
Consumers were disappointed when the plan was launched.
The Wayne government didn't officially announce the details until later this month, but according to an exclusive report by star Martin Regg Cohen, it may be harder for consumers to initially find wine in the grocery store than beer.
In addition, half of the new stores will only run Ontario-
The wine brewed in the first three years has been open for six years.
Year introduction phase. Why so slow?
Compared to meeting the repressed needs, the government seems to place more emphasis on protecting its bottom line and appeasing local wine interests
Consumer needs for convenience and choice.
Should go further.
It should expand restrictions on grocery wine sales while promoting local wine sales. It can do both.
First, wine will be available at 150 grocery stores for more than 6 years, while beer will eventually be available at 450 stores.
A wine license may be issued in the future, but this is a very long introduction period.
The difference seems more to protect the government's interest in selling wine through its 651 profitable LCBO point of sale, which brings about $2 billion in wine sales each year, instead of meeting the convenience of consumers in local supermarkets.
Also, while the government asked the grocery store to use the beer shelf space for the protection of craft breweries in the province, it came up with a more complex and inconvenient way to protect Ontario wineries.
Of the 70 initial licenses to sell wine to grocery stores, only half are in three-year phase-in period.
When the next 80 licenses were granted, 40 of them would be limited to wine in Ontario, and the protectionist provisions were not phased out until 2022.
Six years later today.
It is understandable that the government wants to nurture the precious wine industry in the province.
So should it.
150 wineries in the province employ 3,500 people directly and 10,500 indirectly.
But why not take a very good plan closer to what it has proposed to protect the Ontario craft brewery by adjusting the shelf space that must be used in each franchise store for provincial wines?
In fact, the plan suggests that craft breweries in Ontario can compete with foreign breweries
When Loblaws announced that it would offer all the beer shelf space to small beer makers in Ontario, the beer giant was under control.
So is the reward-
Win Ontario winery
Finally, it seems that the wine planned to launch at the grocery store is only a half empty glass.
After decades of strict control, opening the market has never been easy.
But now that it's finally done, the province should offer consumers more options in all stores that have been licensed to sell wine.
It should increase the number of these licenses more quickly.
This reform is long overdue and the Ontario are ready for a bolder reform.
The editorial was first published in the Toronto Star: consumers in Ontario can raise their glasses to celebrate the news that some grocery stores can finally buy wine later this year.
Or a glass of water. down wine?
From what we know so far.
Consumers were disappointed when the plan was launched.
The Wayne government didn't officially announce the details until later this month, but according to an exclusive report by star Martin Regg Cohen, it may be harder for consumers to initially find wine in the grocery store than beer.
In addition, half of the new stores will only run Ontario-
The wine brewed in the first three years has been open for six years.
Year introduction phase. Why so slow?
Compared to meeting the repressed needs, the government seems to place more emphasis on protecting its bottom line and appeasing local wine interests
Consumer needs for convenience and choice.
Should go further.
It should expand restrictions on grocery wine sales while promoting local wine sales. It can do both.
First, wine will be available at 150 grocery stores for more than 6 years, while beer will eventually be available at 450 stores.
A wine license may be issued in the future, but this is a very long introduction period.
The difference seems more to protect the government's interest in selling wine through its 651 profitable LCBO point of sale, which brings about $2 billion in wine sales each year, instead of meeting the convenience of consumers in local supermarkets.
Also, while the government asked the grocery store to use the beer shelf space for the protection of craft breweries in the province, it came up with a more complex and inconvenient way to protect Ontario wineries.
Of the 70 initial licenses to sell wine to grocery stores, only half are in three-year phase-in period.
When the next 80 licenses were granted, 40 of them would be limited to wine in Ontario, and the protectionist provisions were not phased out until 2022.
Six years later today.
It is understandable that the government wants to nurture the precious wine industry in the province.
So should it.
150 wineries in the province employ 3,500 people directly and 10,500 indirectly.
But why not take a very good plan closer to what it has proposed to protect the Ontario craft brewery by adjusting the shelf space that must be used in each franchise store for provincial wines?
In fact, the plan suggests that craft breweries in Ontario can compete with foreign breweries
When Loblaws announced that it would offer all the beer shelf space to small beer makers in Ontario, the beer giant was under control.
So is the reward-
Win Ontario winery
Finally, it seems that the wine planned to launch at the grocery store is only a half empty glass.
After decades of strict control, opening the market has never been easy.
But now that it's finally done, the province should offer consumers more options in all stores that have been licensed to sell wine.
It should increase the number of these licenses more quickly.
This reform is long overdue and the Ontario are ready for a bolder reform.
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